List of Lizards of Trinidad and Tobago

List of Lizards (Order: Squamata Suborder: Sauria)

Family: Gekkonidae - Geckos
Geckos are small lizards that feed on invertebrates, produce small clutches of eggs and have delicate skin covered with tiny scales, some which have unusual shapes. The Gekkonidae is a large, diverse family of lizards containing 85 genera and more than 800 species. Four genera and 8 species are represented in Trinidad and Tobago.  Despite folklore to the contrary, their bite is not poisonous.  Many species are arboreal while others inhabit human dwellings.  Most lack movable eyelids and have characteristic pads on the undersides of their feet that enable them to cling to smooth surfaces and to run upside down on ceilings

Scientific Name
Local Name
Trinidad
Tobago
Gonatodes caciliae
Variegated gecko
X
Gonatodes humeralis
Orange-spotted gecko, Spot-nose gecko
X
X
Gonatodes ocellatus
Ocellated gecko
X
Gonatodes vittatus vittatus
White-banded gecko, streak lizard
X
X
Hemidactylus mabouia
African woodslave, woodslave, mabouia, twenty-four hours
X
X
Hemidactylus palaichthus
Spiny gecko
X
X
Sphaerodactylus molei
Black and white headed gecko, mole gecko
X
X
Thecadactylus rapicauda
Plantain mabouia, house gecko, woodslave, twenty-four hours
X
X

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Family: Gymnophthalmidae - Microteiids

Gymnophthalmidae contains about 28 genera. Three genera comprising six species occur in Trinidad and Tobago.

Scientific Name
Local Name
Trinidad
Tobago
Bachia flavescens
X
Bachia heteropa alleni
X
Bachia heteropa trinitatis
Worm lizard, ground puppy
X
Gymnophthalmus speciosus
X
Gymnophthalmus underwoodi
Shiny lizard
X
Protoporus shrevei
Luminous lizard, mountain teiid
X

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Family: Iguanidae - Iguanas
The Iguana is the largest of the lizard families and consist of 60 genera and over 700 species.   They are considered a "New World" family because they are found mostly on the Americas.  Iguanas range in type from the tree dwelling arboreal type to the terrestrial and the semi-aquatic type. They have well developed limbs, short tongues that are barely protrusible, and most have long tails, crest, and dewlaps.  Males are bright and varied in coloring.  Most lay eggs in the ground but a few are live bearers.  The desert and forest dwellers are mainly herbivores while the smaller iguanidae are insectivores or omnivores.  Nine species in four genera occur in Trinidad and Tobago.
Scientific Name
Local Name
Trinidad
Tobago
Anolis aeneus
Grey speckled anole, garden lizard
X
Anolis chrysolepis planiceps
Leaf lizard, striped-backed anolis, jungle anole
X
Anolis extremus
Barbados anole
X
Anolis richardii
Gumangala, Richard's anole
X
Anolis trinitatis
Green anole
X
(possibly extinct)
Iguana iguana
Guana, lesard, iguana
X
X
Polychrus marmoratus
Chameleon, many-coloured tree lizard, slow lizard
X
X
Tropidurus plica
Spiny tree lizard, tok-tok, old man
X

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Family: Scincidae - Skinks
Skinks look roughly like true lizards, but most species have no pronounced neck and relatively small legs. Several genera (e.g. Typhlosaurua) have no limbs at all, others, such as Neoseps, have only reduced limbs. Often, their way of moving resembles that of snakes more than that of other lizards. Skinks usually have long, tapering tails that can be shed and regenerated.  Many species are good burrowers having a snout with a maximum length to the vent of approximately 12cm.  Skinks are generally carnivorous.  They are the most specious family of lizards, with 85 genera and about 1, 300 species. Only one of these species occurs in Trinidad and Tobago.
Scientific Name
Local Name
Trinidad
Tobago
Mabuya bistriata
Trinidad skink, bronze skink
X
X

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Family: Teiidae - Teiids

The Teiidae is a New World family containing 18 genera of medium to large lizards. Four species in four genera occur in Trinidad and Tobago.
Scientific Name
Local Name
Trinidad
Tobago
Ameiva ameiva
Common ground lizard, zandolie
X
X
Cnemidophorus lemniscatus
Striped runner, foot-shaker
X
X
Kentropyx striatus
Rain lizard
X
Tupinambis teguixin
Matte
X
X

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Source: Murphy, John C. (1997), Amphibians and Reptiles of Trinidad and Tobago
Krieger Publishing Company
This book is highly recommended.
For further information please contact the publisher at:
Phone in United States 800-724-0025 or 321-724-9542
www.krieger-publishing.com